REVISTA

La escala de expresión facial en ratones: ¿es una herramienta útil?

Valoración Valoración: 3 Estrellas

Descripción: La escala de expresión facial se considera un avance para evaluar el dolor en roedores pero realmente aún no conocemos cual es el valor basal de un animal sin dolor.

TITULO FUENTE ORIGINAL:

The Mouse Grimace Scale: A Clinically Useful Tool

AUTORES:

Miller AL, Leach MC

REVISTA ABREV.:

PLOS one

AÑO:

2015

REFERENCIA:

September 25, 2015

DOI:

10.1371/journal.pone.0136000

FECHA DE PUBLICACIÓN:

08/10/2015

RESUMEN ORIGINAL:

Medical research has a heavy and continuing demand for rodent models across a range of disciplines. Behavioural assessment of pain in such models is highly time consuming, thus limiting the number of models and analgesics that can be studied. Facial expressions are widely used to assess pain in human infants. Recently the mouse grimace scale (MGS) has been developed and shown to be accurate... + Leer más

Medical research has a heavy and continuing demand for rodent models across a range of disciplines. Behavioural assessment of pain in such models is highly time consuming, thus limiting the number of models and analgesics that can be studied. Facial expressions are widely used to assess pain in human infants. Recently the mouse grimace scale (MGS) has been developed and shown to be accurate and reliable, requiring only a short amount of training for the observer. This system therefore has the potential to become a highly useful tool both in pain research and clinical assessment of mouse pain. To date, the MGS has only been used as a research tool, however there is increasing interest in its use in cage-side clinical assessment. It is often wrongly assumed that MGS scores of animals not in pain (i.e. at baseline) are zero. Here, we aimed to assess the variability in baseline MGS scores between cohorts, sexes and strains of mice. Establishing the presence of a consistent baseline MGS score could lead to a valuable clinical pain assessment tool for mice when baseline information from the individual mouse may not be available as a comparator. Results demonstrated a significant difference in baseline MGS scores between both sexes (males > females) and strains of mice. The method used to score the facial action units (Live vs. retrospectively from still images) demonstrated significant differences in scores with live scores being significantly lower than retrospective scoring from images. The level of variation shown demonstrates the need for further research to be undertaken with regard to establishing baseline MGS scores for specific strains and sexes of mice, taking into account the method of scoring, prior to considering clinical implementation of this method in pain assessment.

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